Do guide dogs have culture? The case of indirect social learning


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Output type: Journal article

UM6P affiliated Publication?: Yes

Author list: Guillo, Dominique; Claidiere, Nicolas

Publisher: PALGRAVE MACMILLAN LTD

Publication year: 2020

Journal: HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES COMMUNICATIONS (2662-9992)

Journal acronym: HUM SOC SCI COMMUN

Volume number: 7

Issue number: 1

ISSN: 2662-9992

eISSN: 2662-9992

Languages: English (EN-GB)


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Abstract

In the study of animal behaviour, culture is often seen as the result of direct social transmission from a model to a conspecific. In this essay, we show that unrecognised cultural phenomena are sustained by a special form of indirect social learning (ISL). ISL occurs when an individual B learns a behaviour from an individual A through something produced by A. A's behavioural products can be chemicals, artefacts, but also, we argue, behaviours of another group or species that are the consequence of A's actions. For instance, a behaviour-guiding a blind person-can be transmitted from dog A to dog B, because the fact that dog A learns the behaviour creates in the mind of the trainer representations about the efficacy of the training practice that can be transmitted to another human, who can then train dog B. These dog behaviours have all the properties of standard cultural behaviours and spread in some dog populations through the exploitation of the social learning capacities of another group/species. Following this idea requires a change in perspective on how we see the social transmission of behaviours and brings forward the fact that certain cultural practices can spread among animals through a cultural co-evolutionary dynamic with humans or other animals.


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Last updated on 2022-16-01 at 23:18