Benefits of circular agriculture for cropping systems and soil fertility in oases


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Output type: Journal article

UM6P affiliated Publication?: Yes

Author list: El Janati M., Akkal-Corfini N., Bouaziz A., Oukarroum A., Robin P., Sabri A., Chikhaoui M., Thomas Z.

Publisher: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)

Publication year: 2021

Journal: Sustainability (Switzerland) (2071-1050)

Volume number: 13

Issue number: 9

ISSN: 2071-1050

eISSN: 2071-1050

URL: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85105381556&doi=10.3390%2fsu13094713&partnerID=40&md5=5b052f7789e4e465316742bd64261e3a

Languages: English (EN-GB)


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Abstract

Circular agriculture is an effective approach for the management of soil organic inputs that improves soil fertility and cropping system sustainability. We developed a cropping system typology and assessed effects of crop rotation, organic fertilization, and crop residue management on soil fertility properties. Farmers in Drâa-Tafilalet oases in Morocco were surveyed, and soil was sampled and analyzed. In the most common cropping systems (Type I), date palms were associated with cereals, forages, and perennial crops. Type II cropping systems referred to a monocropped date palm of only one cultivar. In Type III, date palm was associated with other crops on part of the utilized agricultural area and monocropped on the other part. In all cropping systems, mean soil organic matter (SOM) content was less than 1.5% and the SOM:clay ratio was less than 12%, which increased the soil degradation risk. Livestock was combined with crops in Type I and III cropping systems and produced 19.4 and 24.2 t of manure per farm per year, respectively. Type I and II cropping systems produced annually 0.98 and 2.1 t.ha−1 of dry palms, respectively. Recycling these organic waste products remains a promising option that could produce organic inputs and offset the current lack of manure. © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


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Last updated on 2021-25-11 at 23:21